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    Shen Xue (R) and Zhao Hongbo from China perform at the gala exhibition of the Grand Prix of Figure Skating Final in Tokyo December 6, 2009. Shen and Zhao won the gold medal, followed by compatriots Pang Qing and Tong Jian. Aliona Savchenko and Robin Szolkowy of Germany finished third.

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    Tong Jian and Pang Qing from China perform at the gala exhibition of the Grand Prix of Figure Skating Final in Tokyo December 6, 2009.

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    Nathalie Pechalat (top) and Fabian Bourzat from France perform at the gala exhibition of the Grand Prix of Figure Skating Final in Tokyo December 6, 2009.

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    South Korea's Kim Yu-na performs at the gala exhibition of the Grand Prix of Figure Skating Final in Tokyo December 6, 2009.

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    Japan's Miki Ando performs at the gala exhibition of the Grand Prix of Figure Skating Final in Tokyo December 6, 2009. 

    [Agencies]

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    Hong Kong's Adam Raby scores a try as Japan's Koji Wada (R) fails to tackle him during the men's final rugby sevens gold medal match at the East Asian Games in Hong Kong December 6, 2009.

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    Japan's Masahiro Tsuiki tackles Hong Kong's Ho Tsz Chun (bottom) during the men's rugby sevens gold medal match of the East Asian Games in Hong Kong December 6, 2009.

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    China's Liu Zige competes in the women's 200m butterfly final at the East Asian Games in Hong Kong December 6, 2009. Liu won the gold medal.

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    Hong Kong's Ng Sum Chun and Lam Wai Yi (R) compete in the Latin American dance Samba event during the East Asian Games in Hong Kong December 6, 2009.

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    South Korea's Jeong Da-rae stretches before the women's 50m breaststroke final at the East Asian Games in Hong Kong December 6, 2009.

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    China's Yao Yan hits a shot during her table tennis women's singles semifinal match against South Korea's Seok Hajung at the East Asian Games in Hong Kong December 6, 2009.

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    Ryo Tateishi of Japan swims during the men's 100m breaststroke heats at the East Asian Games in Hong Kong December 6, 2009.

    [Agencies]

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    A woman with a bicycle walks next to a globe which is a part of of an installation in downtown Copenhagen December 6, 2009. Copenhagen is the host city for the United Nations Climate Change Conference 2009 from December 7 until December 18.

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    A Danish policeman stands next to an art installation located near the exit of the Bella Center in Copenhagen December 6, 2009. Thousands of environmentalists and politicians will gather here for the United Nations Climate Change Conference 2009 which opens on December 7 and runs until December 18. The biggest U.N. climate talks in history are aimed at working out a new pact to curb global warming, replacing the 1997 Kyoto Protocol.

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    A woman on a bicycle passes a huge tree stump which is a part of the Ghost Forest Exhibition in front of the Danish Parliament in Copenhagen December 6, 2009. Copenhagen is the host city for the United Nations Climate Change Conference 2009, from December 7 until December 18.

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    A woman touches an ice sculpture of a polar bear in downtown Copenhagen December 6, 2009. Copenhagen is the host city for the United Nations Climate Change Conference 2009, from December 7 until December 18.

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    A combination picture shows different globes as a part of an installation in downtown Copenhagen December 6, 2009. Copenhagen is the host city for the United Nations Climate Change Conference 2009, which lasts from December 7 until December 18.

    [Agencies]

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    Players of Guangdong team celebrate after winning the men's basketball final against Shandong team at the 11th Chinese National Games in Jinan, east China's Shandong Province, Oct. 28, 2009. Guangdong won 81-76 and took the gold medal. (

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    Cao Zhenhua (R) of Shandong team vies with a player of Guangdong team durnig the men's basketball final at the 11th Chinese National Games in Jinan, east China's Shandong Province, Oct. 28, 2009. Shandong team lost the match 76-81 and took the silver medal.

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    Players of Guangdong team celebrate on the awarding podium after the men's basketball final against Shandong team at the 11th Chinese National Games in Jinan, east China's Shandong Province, Oct. 28, 2009. Guangdong won 81-76 and took the gold medal.

     (Xinhua/Yang Lei)

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    Players of Shanghai team celebrate during the awarding ceremony for the men's volleyball final at the 11th Chinese National Games in Jinan, capital of east China's Shandong Province, Oct. 27, 2009. Shanghai won the match against the People's Liberation Army (PLA) team 3-0 and claimed the title.

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    Players of the People's Liberation Army (PLA) team salute during the awarding ceremony for the men's volleyball final at the 11th Chinese National Games in Jinan, capital of east China's Shandong Province, Oct. 27, 2009. The PLA team won the silver after losing to Shanghai team 0-3.

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    Players of Shanghai team celebrate their victory after the men's volleyball final against the People's Liberation Army (PLA) team at the 11th Chinese National Games in Jinan, capital of east China's Shandong Province, Oct. 27, 2009. Shanghai won 3-0 and claimed the title.

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    He Jiong (Top) of Shanghai team passes the ball during the men's volleyball final against the People's Liberation Army (PLA) team at the 11th Chinese National Games in Jinan, capital of east China's Shandong Province, Oct. 27, 2009. Shanghai won 3-0 and claimed the title.

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    Fang Yingchao of Shanghai team spikes during the men's volleyball final against the People's Liberation Army (PLA) team at the 11th Chinese National Games in Jinan, capital of east China's Shandong Province, Oct. 27, 2009. Shanghai won 3-0 and claimed the title.

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    Players of Shanghai team celebrate during the awarding ceremony for the men's volleyball final at the 11th Chinese National Games in Jinan, capital of east China's Shandong Province, Oct. 27, 2009. Shanghai won the match against the People's Liberation Army (PLA) team 3-0 and claimed the title.

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    Shen Qiong (R) of Shanghai team spikes during the men's volleyball final against the People's Liberation Army (PLA) team at the 11th Chinese National Games in Jinan, capital of east China's Shandong Province, Oct. 27, 2009. Shanghai won 3-0 and claimed the title.

    (Xinhua/Fan Jun)

  •     JINAN, East China, Oct. 26 -- A female runner competing in China's National Games has tested positive for a banned substance, in the third doping scandal to stain the Oct. 16-28 competition.

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    Wang Jing of Fujian Province dashes to the end point during the final of women's 100m sprint at the 11th Chinese National Games in Jinan, east China's Shandong Province, Oct. 22, 2009.

    Wang Jing, winner of the women's 100m race on Thursday, was kicked out of the competition and her results were stripped off, awarding Jiangsu province representative Jiang Lan, silver medalist in the women's 100m, the gold.

    It is the third doping case at the Games after Guo Linna, a rower from Henan Province and Li Jie, a shooter from Inner Mongolia were found to haven taken banned substances earlier at the Games.

    Elsewhere in athletics, Li Yanxi of Hebei broke the oldest Chinese track field national record as he rewrote the men's 28-year-old triple jump record with 17.59 meters on Monday.

    The 25-year-old Li, the 2006 Asian Games champion in Doha, also broke the Asian record of 17.35 set by Kazakhstan's Oleg Sakirkin in 1994.

    The national mark of 17.34 was set by legendary Zou Zhenxian at the 3rd Athletics World Cup in Rome in 1981.

    In Monday's program, Peng Shuai took central stage of the competition by winning her third gold at Games after partnering Xu Yifan to claim the women's doubles title.

    The team from Tianjin were hardly tested by Sichuan's Grand Slam winners Zheng Jie/Yan Zi to secure the gold at 6-4, 6-1.

    The title came as the icing on the cake as Peng has inspired the team of Tianjin for the women's team title and secured the mixed doubles gold on Sunday.

    The 23-year-old is also in the run for a record four golds at the prestigious meet by reaching the final at the singles event, where Peng will take on Zhejiang's Han Xinyun on Tuesday.

    "I haven't thought too much about the singles event," said Peng, "I'm very happy at the moment, and meanwhile very tired. I just want to take a good rest and fight tomorrow.

    "Either lose or win, I will be happy, since I have already harvested three gold medals."

    In road cycling, veteran cyclist Wong Kam-po sprinted in the end of a 201-kilometer route and brought Hong Kong the first gold medal at the national meet.

    It is also Wong's third gold medal in the road cycling event in four National Games.

    (Xinhua) -

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    Chinese sailor Liu Juncheng, 54-year-old, starts his global voyage alone with his "Ho Yo" unpowered sailing ship from a pier of the Yalujiang River in Dandong, northeast China's Liaoning Province, Oct. 25, 2009. Liu planned to finish about 36,000 sea miles of global voyage alone in three years without stopping overland except supplement provisions.

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    Chinese sailor Liu Juncheng, 54-year-old, poses with Chinese national flag as he starts his global voyage alone with his "Ho Yo" unpowered sailing ship from a pier of Yalujiang River in Dandong, northeast China's Liaoning Province, Oct. 25, 2009.

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    Chinese sailor Liu Juncheng, 54-year-old, waves to friends and relatives as he starts his global voyage alone with his "Ho Yo" unpowered sailing ship from a pier of the Yalujiang River in Dandong, northeast China's Liaoning Province, Oct. 25, 2009.

    (Xinhua/Chen Hao)

  • JINAN: Athens Olympic champion Liu Xiang ignited a sold-out Olympic sports center with victory in the men's 110m hurdles finals at the 11th Chinese National Games here on Sunday.

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    Olympic gold medalist Liu Xiang (C) from Shanghai jubilates while Ji Wei(L) of the People's Liberation Army (PLA) team and Shi Dongpeng from Hebei watch on the podium after the men's 110m hurdles of athletics at the 11th Chinese National Games in Jinan, east China's Shandong Province, Oct. 25, 2009.

    The 26-year-old Liu, who finished second at the Shanghai Golden Grand Prix last month, exploded out of the starting blocks and hit the line first with a last-gasp burst in 13.34 seconds.

    The result was good enough for the 2007 world champion to win the title, but far off his former world record and personal best of 12.88 seconds.

    "I just wanted to keep the pace, keep steady. I kept watching my opponents during the race. I didn't make my upmost to spurt," Liu said after the race.

    Ji Wei of the Peoples Liberation Army, who placed first in the Saturday's heats, finished second in 13.42. Liu's national teammate Shi Dongpeng stood third in 13.63.

    Liu made an iconic bug-eyed expression to amuse the audiences before the race. The former record holder trotted around the stadium after crossing the line, waving arms to audiences, attracting thunderous cheers and applauses from a more than 50,000 crowd.

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    Olympic goldmedalist Liu Xiang (R) from Shanghai competes during the men's 110m hurdles of athletics at the 11th Chinese National Games in Jinan, east China's Shandong Province, Oct. 25, 2009.

    "Thanks a lot for the Shandong peoples' support and also the media. I felt great tonight," Liu added.

    The race was Liu's first since he staged his comeback from Achilles tendon surgery last month at the Shanghai Golden Grand Prix. He finished second in a wind-aided 13.15 seconds after crossing the line neck and neck with American Terrence Trammell.

    "After I accepted the surgery, I was in doubt of myself and cannot see my future. But with one match after another, I gradually recovered. I believed in myself." said Liu.

    As the first Chinese male athlete to win an Olympic track gold, Liu is one of the nation's favorite sports stars like NBA Houston Rockets' center Yao Ming.

    Supporters were shocked and heartbroken when Liu limped out of the Bird's Nest last year at the Beijing Olympics due to the foot injury.

    Thirteen months later, the strong-minded man thrilled the home crowd with strong comeback in Shanghai and proved he still had the strength to catch up with current record holder Dayron Robles of Cuba.

    Liu's victory on Sunday made him become the first Chinese athlete to win an event in a row in three straight Games.

    "To be a triple champion was great. I still hope to win the fourth next time," said a beaming Liu.

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    Olympic goldmedalist Liu Xiang (R) from Shanghai competes during the men's 110m hurdles of athletics at the 11th Chinese National Games in Jinan, east China's Shandong Province, Oct. 25, 2009.

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    Olympic goldmedalist Liu Xiang (C) from Shanghai competes during the men's 110m hurdles of athletics at the 11th Chinese National Games in Jinan, east China's Shandong Province, Oct. 25, 2009.

    [Xinhua]

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    Peng Shuai from Tianjin returns a shot during the women's singles semifinal of tennis against Yan Zi from Sichuan at the 11th Chinese National Games in Jinan, capital of east China's Shandong Province, Oct. 26, 2009. Peng Shuai won the match 2-0 and advanced into the final.

    JINAN, East China, Oct. 26 -- Chinese tennis star Peng Shuai from Tianjin beat Sichuan's Yan Zi 6-0, 6-1 on Monday for the women's singles final at the 11th Chinese National Games.

    "I am surprised and happy to achieve such results," said Peng Shuai, third seed of the singles event after Li Na and Zheng Jie.

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    Yan Zi from Sichuan returns a shot during the women's singles semifinal of tennis against Peng Shuai from Tianjin at the 11th Chinese National Games in Jinan, capital of east China's Shandong Province, Oct. 26, 2009. Yan Zi lost the match 0-2.

    "I feel more grateful to the people who support and help me. I will hold on to the next matches. And then I will have a rest after the tournament," said Peng.

    Peng has become the top favorite to win the title after Chinese number one Li pulled out of the tournament due to injury and Zheng's early exit.

    Peng, already winning two golds at the team event and the mixed doubles, will also have a chance to win the women's doubles that is to kick off later on Monday.

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    Peng Shuai from Tianjin returns a shot during the women's singles semifinal of tennis against Yan Zi from Sichuan at the 11th Chinese National Games in Jinan, capital of east China's Shandong Province, Oct. 26, 2009. Peng Shuai won the match 2-0 and advanced into the final.

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    Peng Shuai from Tianjin returns a shot during the women's singles semifinal of tennis against Yan Zi from Sichuan at the 11th Chinese National Games in Jinan, capital of east China's Shandong Province, Oct. 26, 2009. Peng Shuai won the match 2-0 and advanced into the final.
    (Xinhua/Yang Zongyou)

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    Yang Zhe from Shandong jubilates on the podium during the awarding ceremony after the men's 105kg final of weight-lifting at the 11th Chinese National Games in Jinan, capital of east China's Shandong Province, Oct. 26, 2009. Yang claimed the title with a total weight of 402kg.

    JINAN, East China, Oct. 26 -- Teenager Yang Zhe of Shandong stunned veteran Wang Hailong with obvious advantage to win the gold medal in the men's 105kg weightlifting at the National Games Monday.

    Yang, winner in the national championships in 2008, took the lead since the snatch to nail the gold with one attempt left, totalling at 402kg.

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    Yang Zhe from Shandong competes during the men's 105kg final of weight-lifting at the 11th Chinese National Games in Jinan, capital of east China's Shandong Province, Oct. 26, 2009. Yang claimed the title with a total weight of 402kg.

    However, the 18-year-old Yang's winning result had a whopping deficit of 34kg, compared with the weight lifted by the Olympic champion Andrei Aramnau of Belarus in the Beijing Olympics.

    "I'm still young. I will keep improving my result and surpass my idol Cui Wenhua one day," Yang told the press.

    Cui, taking four golds in a row in the National Games, set the national record of the total at 420kg, before retiring after the 10th National Games in 2005.

    "I know there is a wide gap between Cui and I, but I am confident. There is still time."

    Wang of Heilongjiang, winner in last Games in the 94kg division, upgraded to the 105kg division due to the increasing bodyweight.

    However, Wang could not dominate the new division when he just succeeded in one lift in jerk to take the silver at 393kg, nine kilos short of Yang.

    Zhang Lixiong of Hebei, national champion in 2009, collected bronze at 390kg.